On the Completion of the Old Uyghur Altun Yaruk Sudur Text According to Chinese and Mongolian Texts

Hacer Tokyürek

On the Completion of the Old Uyghur Altun Yaruk Sudur Text According to Chinese and Mongolian Texts

(66th Annual Meeting of the PIAC Göttingen, 2024)

The Suvarṇaprabhāsa-sūtra, originally in Sanskrit, has been translated into various languages including Chinese, Tibetan, Japanese, Khotanese, Old Uyghur, Sogdian, Mongolian, and Tangut. Some of these translations are directly translated from the original Sanskrit text, while others are translated from intermediary languages. The most important of these intermediate languages is Chinese. Because Chinese was considered one of the sacred languages of Buddhism, especially during the 7th to 11th centuries, and many communities translated important works from Chinese. For example, the Old Uyghur Altun Yaruk Sudur text was translated in the 11th century by Šinko Šeli Tutuŋ based on the Chinese version of I-tsing’s Yi Jing. It is observed that among the Tibetan and Mongolian translations of the same text, there are also copies based on the Chinese version of I-tsing. Therefore, The Chinese I-tsing version can be beneficial in establishing connections between texts.

The most complete manuscript of the Old Uyghur Altun Yaruk Sudur text, which is the subject of this paper, is the St. Petersburg version. However, it has been determined that there are more than 65 versions based on the Berlin fragments. Despite the many versions and complete texts available, unfortunately, there are still deficiencies in the Old Uyghur Altun Yaruk Sudur text. Some of these deficiencies have been addressed based on the Berlin fragments and Chinese versions, while others are still missing. The purpose of this paper is to complete some of the missing words and lines in the Old Uyghur Altun Yaruk Sudur text based on the Chinese and Mongolian versions. For this purpose, starting from some Bodhisattva names found in Altun Yaruk Sudur I. Tegzinč, equivalents in the Chinese and Mongolian versions of the text will first be compared. Then, based on these equivalences, missing words and lines will be completed.